Mark Oehlert – This a real trust issue

There’s going to be a change that has to occur, from thinking that there are certain people within the organization that are somehow qualified to talk to a customer, versus training everybody in your organization to be ambassadors of your company. So this is a real trust issue. Do I trust just my PR and Marketing Departments and maybe Customer Service to have communications? Or do I trust everybody to have communications? And do I encourage everybody to participate in for a, and in discussion in boards and on Twitter and on Facebook? Do I encourage everybody to have interactions with customers? So, if a big business wants to engage in these conversational dynamics, but they only want to do it through certain points, through certain old school kind of points, I kind of talk about that’s an example of how you use a 1.0 tool, or a 2.0 tool in a 1.0 kind of way.

I work for DOD so pardon the military examples. But you can hammer in that nail with a butt of a rifle, but that’s not the best use of that piece of technology. So, yeah, you’re using a highly sophisticated piece of technology. Do something really almost primitive. And you create a lot of additional work for yourself because it’s not going to do that well. So, yeah, you could create these choke points within the organization, if you want to engage in these conversational dynamics, unless you realize that the whole organization can become ambassadors and can carry on these conversations. And then you spread the work around. You spread the conversation around. And you increase the potential footprint of the company on their customer base.

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