Jon Husband – Making the service feedback loop natural

Now, there is lots of opportunity there obviously for aggregating, analyzing, but also getting into various kinds of discussions with customers or with suppliers. From there I think it’s just sensible and intelligent process and work design to obtain the benefits of collaboration.

I think companies have been doing this in one form or another for long time; again tell me about making my points about whether it’s quality circles or Six Sigma or almost any kind of continuous improvement initiative have been looking actually for ways to collaborate… Well, that’s the point. It becomes then a cultural point because what I want to say is that given that we’ve already been doing this in various forms, trying to improve for many years now, what is it that gets in the way?

Before we could interact with the company whether you’re a supplier or a customer by let’s say telephone call, you still can, by mail, by going visiting or meeting, but they were all seen as formal channels, and the frustration that built up over the years was that it was very… the company controlled very rarely where these inputs acknowledged or used. And I think, I’m generalizing, making vast generalizations here, I think that my recollections through the years of growing up, is that when people did have their input acknowledged, whether that’s by a response, or letter, or phone call, or maybe some kind of credit voucher – whatever the response is, they felt like they’d won a small victory. That’s I think the kind of thing that needs to change. It needs to be seen as a natural and necessary, as part of the service feedback loop that must be maintained at all times and at all costs. And I think that applies…

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